Brussel Sprouts…

courtesy Lake Tahoe Markets

Brussels sprouts are not only a versatile food in many cultural cuisines, but they also pack a number of health benefits, including their ability to lower cholesterol balance hormone levels, improve digestion, reduce oxidative stress, protect the heart, aid the immune system, and increase circulation, among others.

Brussels sprouts are a type of cabbage and bear the scientific name Brassica oleracea. The sprouts are grown on long stalks that can be harvested multiple times each year, and they are small, green bulbs that look like miniature cabbages. The taste of Brussels sprouts is also quite similar to cabbage, notably quite bitter, but can be improved significantly when they are broiled or cooked. Brussels sprouts, as the name implies, were grown in and around the region of Brussels, Belgium for centuries. This cabbage varietal is native to the Mediterranean and European region and is now primarily grown in the Netherlands and Germany.

Brussels sprouts are rich in vitamin C, vitamin B6, vitamin A and vitamin K, as well as dietary fiber, manganese, copper, potassium and many other essential vitamins.  They also include flavonoids and polyphenolic compounds.

Brussels sprouts are prepared in many different ways around the world, ranging from roasting, broiling, and frying to steaming and adding them to a stir-fry. Brussels sprouts should never be overcooked, as the flavor can become quite sour or unpleasant. However, when cooked properly, they can be complementary to many meat dishes, and can be topped with dozens of sauces and spices. Aside from their delicious flavor, many people add Brussels sprouts to their diet in order to enjoy the many health benefits of this miniature cabbage.

Thanks to Lake Tahoe Market….Bringing the Market to you. Brussle Sprouts not only good, my favorite way to chow down. My dad did this thing with salt and vinegar…shot of fresh squeezed lemon juice. This is a very easy veggie to grow. The only issues I’ve ever had growing is with aphids. No matter where I have grown them (5 different USDA Agricultural growing zones), aphids always seem to show up…

Until Next Time…

Happy Gardening…